New Research

In many countries around the world, the meaning of marriage has changed dramatically over the past decades. From being an important and even crucial component of a successful life, marriage is increas­ingly seen as one option among many. Nowhere is this more true than in Nordic countries like Sweden, in which most couples experience long cohabitation periods before marriage, and many forego it altogether. Nonetheless, important distinctions remain, and researchers from the University of Stockholm seek to better understand the relationship between couples’ intentions to marry, and whether those intentions become reality.

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A Dwindling Dating Pool

Commentators have noticed for some time now the seeming dearth of “marriageable” men, i.e. the ones with education, employment, and income comparable to women’s. Many factors have been blamed for this trend—lack of economic opportunity, higher rates of female education, a crunched labor market. Now, researchers from Cornell, Brigham Young, and South Utah Universities have joined together for a systematic study of this phenomenon in America.

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Children Achieving Less

Researchers have long understood that parental divorce tends to lead to lower educational attainment for children. Now, a group of scholars seek to understand exactly how this trend occurs.

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Growing Old, With Family and Friends

Given the past century’s dramatic increases in life expectancy, at least for those living in developed nations, much research is now centering on how to increase the quality of those additional years of life. Adding to this research is a new paper assessing how marriage, parenthood, and social network impacts the subjective well-being and mental health of older adults.

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Hormonal Contraception = Decreased Perseverance

It has long been known that hormonal contraception alters women’s brains, moods, and bodies in ways that are still being discovered. Now, a team of researchers from Texas Christian University are seeking to uncover the impact of hormonal contraception on one very specific brain function—perseverance.

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Birth Control and the Brain

Preliminary research delivered at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America indicates that women taking oral contraceptives “had significantly smaller hypothalamus volume, compared to women not taking the pill.”

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What’s Love Got to Do With It?

Parents are often guilty of putting their own relationship on hold while they focus time, attention, and other resources on raising their children. That may be a dire mistake, according to new research based in Nepal, where a team of Canadian and American researchers discovered that self-reported parental affection was associated with children’s greater educational attainment and later marriage.

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Who Has the Most Sex?

Research has long documented that sex is important to a marriage—both the quantity and the quality. Consequently, scholars continue to be interested in what makes for sexual frequency and satisfaction within marriage. In a new study, Emma Altgelt and Andrea Meltzer of Florida State University seek to understand how premarital factors might impact both the frequency and quality of sex in the early years of a first, heterosexual marriage.

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Why Danes Divorce

Research has long documented that sex is important to a marriage—both the quantity and the quality. Consequently, scholars continue to be interested in what makes for sexual frequency and satisfaction within marriage. In a new study, Emma Altgelt and Andrea Meltzer of Florida State University seek to understand how premarital factors might impact both the frequency and quality of sex in the early years of a first, heterosexual marriage.

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